Questions & Answers Wk 10

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Every week Team GoNorth! answers ten questions related to the module topic from student explorers -- so stay tuned and submit YOUR questions!

Dr James Foster: The key is to freeze the crystals using liquid nitrogen, which is at a temperature colder than anywhere in the Arctic. We them place the crystals in specialized holders and then in a thermos so keep them cold.

 

Do you know how Team GoNorth! saves the snow so NASA can study it?

submitted by:
Abby at the Week 10 Chat

Dr James Foster: Probably so. Not all of the extinctions are due to human interference -- some creatures lose their niche to others in the course of time. However, we humans are affecting the habitat of a number of species.

 

Do you think more animals will be on the endangered list and or extinct?

submitted by:
Ally & Brittney at the Week 10 Chat


Dr James Foster: NASA is the National Aeronautic and Space Administration -- an organization devoted to science and engineering. There are 11 different NASA centers.

What is NASA?

submitted by:
Jon P at the Week 10 Chat

Dr James Foster: It terms of earth science, NASA satellites give us a global perspective of our precious planet. For example, we can now more easily see when and from where storms approach.

How is NASA important to the world?

submitted by:
Jon P at the Week 10 Chat

Dr James Foster: Without question, humans are increasing greenhouse gases, which are known to increase temperature. However, it's not know for sure whether or not some of the recent warming that's been observed is a result of natural variations.

do you think people are the doing of climate change

submitted by:
Maddy, Kaia, & Abigail F at the Week 10 Chat

Dr James Foster: If the changes are natural the consequences can be bad for humans too, but our biggest concern is the changes we can do something about. If climate continues to warm, some regions that were previously too cold for agriculture could be used for growing food. Some species will increase their range. There are some other reasons too.

We think that climate change is bad. But could you give us reason that it's not?

submitted by:
Maddy, Kaia, & Abigail F at the Week 10 Chat

Dr James Foster:  There are lots of stuff we didn't recognize, some man made particles and some natural particles that we rarely see in snowpacks.

 

Is there anything weird that you found in the samples?

submitted by:
Millie & Sandstorm at the Week 10 Chat

Dr James Foster: I think being aware that there are alternative energy sources. Making an effort not to waste energy or food, for example, can make a big difference over time. Kids are actually doing a better job with this than are adults.

 

Is there anything that we as kids can do to make the biggest impact to slow or stop climate change?

submitted by:
Mr Krueck's Class at the Week 10 Chat

Dr James Foster: Very carefully, so the delicate little beauties won't break. :   }

Actually, we collect them using a sticky substance that freezes them instantly so we can take the little wonders back to the lab for closer examination.

How do you study snow crystals?

submitted by:
Ms Curran's Class at the Week 10 Chat

Dr James Foster: Yes, the soot and haze particles are quite obvious under the microscope. These particles act to hasten snowmelt and are, in general, a result of atmospheric pollution.






We saw in pictures from 2007 in Chukotka there was a lot of soot in the snow. Can you see that when you analyze them? Does it make it harder?

submitted by:
Ms Havey's Class at the Week 10 Chat